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What an exciting time to be a Corporate MC!

The last year has seen me, amongst other assignments, in Cape Town South
Africa for a large financial conference, a series of CEO Summits on
Australia’s beautiful Gold Coast and several times on location in the wine
country of the Hunter Valley. Sure, the days are long, the feet get tired,
but as my dad used to say “it’s better than working in a bank.” Apologies to
any of you who work in a bank and find your jobs exciting, but I think you
get his point.

This newsletter, Expert MC, hopes to share with you tips, techniques and
tools to make your job as an MC easier, more effective and more rewarding.

LinkedIn

I’m sure most of you are already signed up for LinkedIn. I
think it’s a great tool for both networking and research. I recently had an
idea that needed something from within a large organisation. I didn’t know
anyone there. A few minutes on LinkedIn searching the company name lead me
to several people who worked for them who were linked to colleagues of mine.
One email later, I had exactly what I wanted.

The reason I bring this up is that we have a LinkedIn group Expert MC. We
haven’t quite reached critical mass yet, but if everyone on this list joined
up we could start having some lively and useful discussion.

http://lnkd.in/_tPcNU

Dropbox !

I worked as MC at an summit of CIO’s last month. Chief
Information Officers of most major companies in Australia. The one thing
that kept getting mentioned in presentation after presentation was Dropbox.
P.S  it’s free.

Check it out here
http://db.tt/t7AChOG

Absolutely perfect tool for those of us who work at
home on a Desktop and then go out on assignment with a laptop but need to
keep them both perfectly in sync.

Expert MC Tip     –     Time.

Once you’ve lost it, you’ll never get it back.

Try and be pro-active in your dealings with your speakers. Tell them when
they must be finished. Ask them if they have a watch or timer. Arrange
timecards. Tell them where you will be standing. Ask them to acknowledge
that they have seen the time cards. Ask them how long they are doing and if
they might finish before that time. Be assertive.

Incidentally, if at all possible, I get someone else to
be the timekeeper. This frees up my role greatly so I can be far more
effective. If you have a designated timekeeper, they can be positioned in
the ideal spot for the entire event.

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